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Puyo Puyo

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Page 1:
Introduction

Page 2:
Puyo Puyo

Page 3:
Puyo Puyo Tsū

Page 4:
Puyo Puyo SUN

Page 5:
Puyo Puyo~n

Page 6:
Nazo Puyo

Page 7:
Nazo Puyo (cont.)

Page 8:
Minna de Puyo Puyo
Puyo Puyo Fever
Puyo Puyo Fever 2

Page 9:
Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary

Page 10:
Puyo Puyo BOX

Page 11:
Puyo Puyo 7
Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary

Discuss on the Forums!

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Super Nazo Puyo: Rulue no Roux (す~ぱ~なぞぷよ ルルーのルー) - Super Famicom (1995)

Cover (Super Nazo Puyo: Rulue no Roux)

Although there aren't many major additions to the base formula of the series, Super Nazo Puyo: Rulue no Roux is another fun game with another set of engaging missions to play through. A few slight additions here and there help to provide a new experience, and make you think in new ways when clearing a mission.

The main change of the game is that you're not only able to play as Arle, but as the title implies, Rulue is a main character as well. Both Arle and Rulue come with their own unique sets of puzzles, storylines, opponents, and music, though Rulue's puzzles change things up by adding a new type of puyo. New to the the game are Iron Puyo; these Puyo are much like Blocks of the previous Nazo Puyo games, in that they cannot be cleared at all, not even like Nuisance Puyo. However, unlike Blocks, Iron Puyo fall with gravity just like regular Puyo. Rulue's set of missions uses them both to create a great deal of interesting scenarios, such as missions where you're tasked with carefully navigating your set of Puyo through Blocks to start off a required chain, or missions where you have to consider and use the way Iron Puyo fall to create setups for chains.

Since only Rulue's missions employ these tactics, her part is the more difficult of the two. Thankfully, no matter the character, the game remains mostly fair throughout. There is one notable difficulty increase, however: your character's health doesn't refill after completing a set of missions. This is done to place more of an importance on the experience system established in Nazo Puyo: Arle no Roux. Your health still refills upon leveling up, and you gain more health every level. You're also not able to skip sections using a password like in the previous game, as now your progress is saved automatically.

Compile used the jump from the Game Gear to the SNES to make a few tweaks to the game, all of them thankfully making things much convenient. As there's more screen space, the display during a mission holds more information, solving a problem that was very prominent in the previous entry. In addition to having a constant reminder of what your current mission objective is, you're also shown how many missions you've completed, and how many you need to complete in order to finish a character's quest and move on to the next character. Unfortunately, you're still not given clear indications about your health and experience, which is unfortunate since there's still a good deal of space available for such information.

Perhaps the most important benefactor is the endless mode, where you are not only able to see the next six sets of Puyo - quite a large advance from Arle no Roux's endless mode with only one set in the preview - but the seemingly random dropping of the Nuisance Puyo is finally made a bit more clear. When you clear a chain, the power of said chain is displayed on a counter on the side of the screen, which is basically your "accumulated" power. The higher the number of your chain, the more power you accumulate - much like a normal Puyo match. The larger the number of your accumulated power, the longer it takes for Nuisance Puyo to fall. When they're about to be dropped, you're given a notification before they finally appear. Though you aren't notified about the amount of Nuisance Puyo at first, they're displayed at the top of your screen when it's time for them to fall, much like in the mainline games. Unfortunately, since the game follows the original Puyo Puyo rules, you cannot offset the Nuisance Puyo. Once they drop, your accumulated power goes back to 0, and the cycle repeats. It's very much like the endless modes of the early Puyo Puyo portable games, though thanks to the differing information shown between each game, it's tough to say which one is the best when it comes to adding a completely fair challenge; the early portable games showed the power of the chain whereas Rulue no Roux doesn't, but its accumulated power counter gives you at least some idea of how safe you are from Nuisance Puyo. At the very least, it's quite easy to say that this endless mode is the best for beginners, thanks to the fact that the easiest difficulty gives you no Nuisance Puyo to worry about.

The game's last offered mode, titled Road to Chains, is basically what the first two Nazo Puyo games offered: a sequence of missions that steadily increase in difficulty, with no hub world in between. Although your character's face shows up just like in the other modes, there's no health system to worry about, so you're free to make as many mistakes as you'd like. There are 60 missions in total in this mode, and although it may seem like quite a bit to do in one sitting, the game now saves your progress. Completed missions can also be returned to at any time. Unfortunately, you're unable to skip missions, so an experienced player may find the mode to be boring until the difficulty picks up in the later missions. A beginner player may find the most use out of this mode, however, as the continued missions introduce very easy versions of certain mindsets you'll need to think through when solving missions in the main game.

Super Nazo Puyo: Rulue no Roux is a game that's definitely worth trying out, especially for beginners. Not only do Rulue's missions offer a new challenge that advanced players will certainly enjoy, but the Road to Chains mode and the change to the endless mode mean that beginner players can get quite a bit of enjoyment out of the game as well.

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Super Nazo Puyo (Super Famicom)

Super Nazo Puyo (Super Famicom)

Super Nazo Puyo (Super Famicom)


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Super Nazo Puyo Tsu: Rulue no Tetsuwan Hanjōki (すーぱーなぞぷよ通 ルルーの鉄腕繁盛記) - Super Famicom (1996)

Cover (Super Nazo Puyo Tsu: Rulue no Tetsuwan Hanjouki)

Again starring Rulue (and this time only Rulue, as opposed to the previous game), Super Nazo Puyo Tsu: Rulue no Tetsuwan Hanjouki is a bit of a unique game in its choice of innovations, as it attempts to push the series closer to the RPG genre. Though this unfortunately means not much is done to spice up the base gameplay or change the other modes, it's still a nice change of pace.

In this game, you're not confined to a series of hub worlds in order to go from mission to mission; instead, you're given a full overworld to explore and travel between different locations. Though there aren't any random encounters or the like on the overworld to make the game truly like an RPG, it's still nice to have a little more to do, and it increases the game's length just a bit with a sense of exploration. The way you progress through the story has been altered as well to accommodate this - instead of simply tackling characters in a hub world before going on to the next hub world and so on, sometimes you'll be tasked with facing characters in a set order, or having to clear a certain few characters' missions before being able to trigger some sort of event to progress. You can also collect items, but since they don't come into play while you're solving missions, it's more than likely you won't be paying too much attention to them. Finally, there are cutscenes sprinkled throughout the game; though they aren't styled like the original Puyo Puyo ones, they're still quite expressive, and very fun to watch. These changes - along with the longer amount of dialogue, and increased characters to interact with - shift the focus more towards the story of the game. Thankfully, the missions don't suffer as a result - they're still quite engaging.

That being said, as overhauled as the traveling system has gotten, the way the missions play out is more or less the same as before. One key difference is that the game now follows Puyo Puyo Tsuu rules for its placement of Puyo, so you can now flip your sets of puyo while they're in between two columns, and also have them climb stair-like patterns with the right positioning. Since many missions rely on both this and the iron Puyo/blocks of the previous game, the game is still as difficult as ever, perhaps even more. Thankfully, the game's difficulty is still fair for the most part, as not much has been done to change the interface, for better or worse. You're still stuck with the health and experience system, however, so you'll have to make every decision carefully or you risk having to do a character's set of missions all over.

The secondary modes also received a change; the Road to Chains mode of the previous game has been overhauled. Instead of being a simple marathon of missions that steadily increase in difficulty, you're now given sections of missions to go through. The number of missions in each section varies, but the common factor across all of the sections is that they all focus on numbers of chains; starting from 2 and ending at 10, each section's missions will always have that specific number of chains. The only exception to this rule is the tenth section, which requires you to clear various, difficult chains over 10 steps long. Though clearing mission after mission of chains may seem intimidating, each section starts off easy and gradually increases in difficulty. One drawback of the previous game's Road To Chains mode was that it started off slowly and could get boring if you weren't a beginner player, but that's not a concern here; you can select from sections at will, with no need to worry about earlier sections - the later ones are obviously much more difficult. This version is also much better for learning the thought process behind solving missions. Many missions have you think in different ways, such as finishing an incomplete chain, or making you think critically about where certain Puyo will fall during a chain; since you're able to select a section at will, you can start on an area you have difficulty with and improve through repetition. Thankfully, there's no health system to worry about here, so it's still an experience meant for learning. All in all, it's much more engaging than before, and with over 120 missions to partake in, you'll be occupied for quite a while.

The endless mode is the only thing that hasn't changed in any way. You're still given the same amount of information as before, which is rather unfortunate since Compile could have taken the time to make the way nuisance Puyo Drop a bit more clear.

Though not much is added in terms of gameplay, Super Nazo Puyo Tsu: Rulue no Tetsuwan Hanjōki is still a fine entry in the Nazo Puyo series. The new missions are quite challenging, and the shift towards the RPG genre makes the main game much more of a delight to play through; if you like the Nazo Puyo series, this is a game you shouldn't pass up. Even if the main story isn't to your liking, the altered Road To Chains mode will certainly satisfy.

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Super Nazo Puyo Tsu (Super Famicom)

Super Nazo Puyo Tsu (Super Famicom)

Super Nazo Puyo Tsu (Super Famicom)


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Nazo Puyo (なぞぷよ) - Windows (1996/2000)

Vol. 1 Cover

Vol. 2 Cover

While Compile continued the Windows edition of its Disc Station mag with regular new Nazo Puyo puzzles, two chunks were eventually released as stand alone volumes at a budget price. The first volume was also previously contained in the Windows port of Puyo Puyo Tsu as its mission mode. But it's not a complete copy; even though the characters are the same, every mission is completely different. This gives a bit more incentive to try out this port. The game can feel unfulfilling by itself, but having it paired with a full Puyo Puyo game helps things out a good deal. Unfortunately, the second volume was never paired with another release in this way.

This Nazo Puyo and its successor are both unfortunately quite a short experience, even when they're put together. Consequently, it's quite easily a disappointment after the PC-98 standalone game had so many missions to offer.

With no extra modes to offer, the first game starts right off with its mission mode. Interestingly enough, said mode plays out differently than any of the other Nazo Puyo mission modes: here, you go through a set of floors, given a character to face on each of them, along with five of their missions. You can select the missions in any order, and although you can complete all the missions of a character if you'd like, you only have to complete a specific amount of missions before you're allowed to move on to the next character (two missions for the first, three for the rest).

Though under normal circumstances this would make the games an easier affair, the difficulty of the missions has been increased quite a bit to compensate. An increase in difficulty certainly sounds intimidating, especially after how difficult the previous PC-98 entry was, but an improvemen is that the overall difficulty has been shifted more to the fair side of things. This is mostly achieved through the interface; not only are you now able to see up to nine sets of your next Puyo, but you're also always given a hint on how to clear your current mission. These changes finally ensure that the heavy trial-and-error aspect is eliminated even more than Arle no Roux did, especially since there's no health system to worry about. Unfortunately, you're not able to fully enjoy these innovations, as there are only a total of 15 missions each game.

Even though the two volumes of this game are the same in terms of gameplay and length, there are at least a few small additions in the second volume. One such addition is that the spritework has been touched up; in the first game, much of it seemed out of place, such as Arle's face on the title screen. The other addition is that you have the option of seeing how to complete the previous volume's missions. Due to the increased difficulty of the two games, it's quite a welcome sight for those who find themselves unable to progress and needing a little help. The game doesn't hold your hand throughout the entire experience, though, as there's no answers given for the second volume's missions. At the very least, players who are stumped can use those answers in order to see the thought process behind working through a mission.

Overall, these two games can be enjoyable, but their short nature definitely holds them back. They aren't something a fan necessarily has to play, since these two games don't bring anything new to the table, and many of the other games offer much, much more.

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Nazo Puyo Vol. 1 (Windows)

Nazo Puyo Vol. 1 (Windows)

Nazo Puyo Vol. 1 (Windows)


Additional screenshots


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Introduction

Page 2:
Puyo Puyo

Page 3:
Puyo Puyo Tsū

Page 4:
Puyo Puyo SUN

Page 5:
Puyo Puyo~n

Page 6:
Nazo Puyo

Page 7:
Nazo Puyo (cont.)

Page 8:
Minna de Puyo Puyo
Puyo Puyo Fever
Puyo Puyo Fever 2

Page 9:
Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary

Page 10:
Puyo Puyo BOX

Page 11:
Puyo Puyo 7
Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary

Discuss on the Forums!

Back to the Index