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Puyo Puyo

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Page 1:
Introduction
Puyo Puyo (MSX)
Puyo Puyo
Puyo Puyo Tsu

Page 2:
Puyo Puyo SUN
Puyo Puyo~n
Puyo Box
Puyo Pop

Page 3:
Puyo Puyo Fever
Puyo Puyo Fever 2
Haro no Puyo Puyo

Page 4:
Madou Monogatari
Madou Monogatari: Hanamaru Daiyouchi Enji
Waku Waku Puyo Puyo Dungeon

Page 5:
Arle no Bouken
Nazo Puyo
Super Nazo Puyo
Puyo Wars
Puyo Puyo Da!
Puyo Localizations

Discuss on the Forums!

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Puyo Puyo SUN (ぷよぷよSUN) - Arcade, Saturn, PlayStation, Nintendo 64, Windows, Game Boy Color (1996)

Japanese Saturn Cover

Japanese N64 Cover

Compile brings the series into the 32-bit era with Puyo Puyo SUN. Puyo Puyo SUN has three story modes - an easy (and short) game starring Draco, a regular (and long) game starring Arle, and a hard (and medium sized) quest starring Schezo, all fully voiced. Other than the massive improvement in graphics - characters not only have unique backgrounds on their board but also show up onscreen when attacking - the only real addition are Sun puyos. These are occasionally dropped on the field, and if you work them into your combos, then you'll do some massive damage to your opponent. There's also a wider range of difficulty selections, to ease newbies into the game.

The arcade original runs on the ST-V hardware, and the ports are all pretty much spot on. The Saturn and PlayStation versions have full motion video intros, while the N64 version doesn't. The PlayStation version is also the "expert" version with a few extra modes, like a gallery and themed unlockables.

The name "Sun" obviously derives from the sun puyos (and the game's plot revolves around the game world being far too hot), but the English word "sun" is actually pronounced closer to "san" when spoken in Japanese - which means "three".

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Designer:

  • Masamitsu "Moo" Niitani

Genre:

Themes:


Puyo Puyo SUN (Saturn)

Puyo Puyo SUN (Saturn)

Puyo Puyo SUN (Saturn)


Additional Screenshots


Puyo Puyo~n (ぷよぷよ〜ん) - Dreamcast, Nintendo 64, PlayStation, Game Boy Color (1999)

Japanese Dreamcast Cover

The biggest addition to Puyo Puyo~n are the special attacks. These are all unique to each character, and can include getting rid of obstacle puyos, shaking the playing field upside down, or eliminating a certain color from your stack. While it's an interesting idea in theory, it really doesn't pan out. You're not allowed to use special attacks in the first stages of the Story mode (until you gain some allies and get their attacks), so it's unfairly difficult at the beginning. And they simply make multiplayer games long and drawn out, as players simply use their attacks over and over until they can't be charged up any more. This, combined with the slow speed in which the puyos fall, maybe Puyo Puyo~n feel very laid back compared to the other games. It's less manic, but at the same time, lets you formulate a strategy easier.

Graphically, Puyo Puyo~n is clearer, but much more subtle than Puyo Puyo SUN, with the characters appearing on the screen a la Puzzle Fighter. The art style is also a bit less cutesy and bright, but looking much better overall. There's only one story mode path, but it's quite long. This is made up by a few extra single player modes, including a task mode similar to Nazo Puyo, and an option for a gigantic playing field. The biggest draw is that four player mode has once again returned, turning Puyo Puyo into one of the best party games around.

While it was originally released on the Dreamcast, it also saw release on the Nintendo 64 under the title "Puyo Puyo~n Party" with a few extra multiplayer modes, and later on the PlayStation with the subtitle "Me and Car-kun". Naturally neither of these versions look as good as the Dreamcast version, due to the lower resolution. The pun in the title of Puyo Puyo~n is less interesting this time around - "yon" is simply Japanese for "four".

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Designer:

  • Masamitsu "Moo" Niitani

Genre:

Themes:


Puyo Puyo~n (Dreamcast)

Puyo Puyo~n (Dreamcast)

Puyo Puyo~n (Dreamcast)

Puyo Puyo~n (Dreamcast)


Puyo Puyo BOX (ぷよぷよBOX) - PlayStation (2000)

Japanese PlayStation Cover

In 2000, Compile released an interesting little collection for the PSOne, called Puyo Puyo BOX. It includes the Mega Drive versions of Puyo Puyo 1 and 2, along with some PocketStation games and a four player mode (since this was absent from the PSOne version of Puyo Puyo~n.) None of this is really all that exciting, especially considering they could've ported the arcade versions, but the real highlight is the Quest Mode.

The Quest Mode is a pure Puyo Puyo RPG. You don't fight enemies normally - you challenge them to a game of Puyo Puyo. Each battle nets you the usual gold and experience, which in turn can be used to upgrade your stats. Higher strength will inflict more nuisance puyos on your opponent, while higher defense will absorb some of your enemy's attacks. You have to be careful not to equip too much heavy equipment however, as they cause your blobs to fall pretty fast.

The plot is the same "find a bunch of medals" stuff in the Madou Monogatari games, although there's plenty of goofiness abound. For example, Arle doesn't just open doors - she bashes through them, sending the door flying into the stratosphere. Naturally, this mode isn't terribly long, and the dungeons are fairly short and easy, but it's an innovative framework for the Puyo Puyo series. I don't see why they couldn't have used better graphics and music for the Quest Mode, especially considering this came out after Puyo Puyo~n (the battles look/sound like the Puyo Puyo 2.) And the random battles can get annoying after awhile. You can run away from most weaker battles, but stronger enemies need to be fought - and since match lasts at least a minute or two, you'd better be in love with Puyo Puyo if you want to stick it through to the end.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Designer:

  • Masamitsu "Moo" Niitani

Genre:

Themes:


Puyo Puyo BOX (PlayStation)

Puyo Puyo BOX (PlayStation)


Additional Screenshots


Puyo Pop / Minna de Puyo Puyo (みんなでぷよぷよ) - Game Boy Advance (2001)

Japanese GBA Cover

Unlike all of the other ports of Puyo Puyo, the Game Boy Advance got its own somewhat unique title, known as "Minna de Puyo Puyo" (Everyone Puyo Puyo) in Japan and "Puyo Pop" everywhere else. Its major feature is four player action using the system link cable, especially useful since you only need one cartridge - a rarity in GBA link games. Gameplay-wise, it's almost exactly the same as Puyo Puyo 2, right down to the background style.

There's also a completely unique story mode, where you run back and forth through a variety of courses, earning prizes (such as galleries) and eventually unlocking the final levels. Given that a lot of the dialogue is actually tutorial entered (plus the relatively light difficulty level), it's clear that this is aimed towards beginners, though more difficult levels are still around. There's also a Mission Mode like Nazo Puyo, where your given a time limit and try to reach as many goals as possible.

By this point, Compile was out of business, so Sega picked up the slack for them. Like many Sonic Team games, there's an option for both Japanese and English language in all cartridges. However, the English script in the American and European versions is much different from the Japanese one. While undoubtedly purists would find this to be a prime offense, the rewritten dialogue is actually much more amusing, and does a far better job at portraying the wackiness of the series. Here's an example of the speech between Arle and Incubus at the beginning:

Japanese Version:

Incubus: Hi, honey. Where are you off to?
Arle: Whatever...Talk about your stuck-up smartalecks.
Incubus: Oh, darling. Even your troubled face is cute in my eyes.
Arle: Jeez...And fifty other lines to get you nowhere.
Incubus: You poor baby... Here let me, beautiful me, warm you up.
Arle: Stop it!

American Version:

Incubus: Hey baby. Come here often?
Arle: ....Go away.
Incubus: Hey! I just want to get to know you! What's your sign, baby?
Arle: Octagon. As in "stop".
Incubus: Ooh, I like a girl with a sense of humor! Let's make jokes together...
Arle: That does it.

Amusingly enough, the Japanese version translates the usual losing cry ("batan-kyu") as "baba bing", where it simply becomes "Oh no!" in the other versions.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Designer:

  • Akinori Nishiyama

Genre:

Themes:


Puyo Pop (GBA)

Puyo Pop (GBA)

Puyo Pop (GBA)

Puyo Pop (GBA)


Portable Editions:

Being that puzzle games are some of the best titles to play on the go, Compile ported all of the Puyo Puyos to various platforms. The first Game Boy one was a little bizarre, given that you had to match blobs with different shapes, making things a bit awkward. This was fixed a bit in Puyo Puyo 2 by introducing striped blocks, an incarnation which also made it to the WonderSwan, Game Gear and Neo Geo Pocket Color (which was the first Puyo Puyo game released unaltered in America, under the title Puyo Pop.) Naturally, Puyo Puyo SUN and Puyo Puyo~n look much better than their predecessors in the color incarnations.

Puyo Pop (Neo Geo Pocket Color)


Additional Screenshots



<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Introduction
Puyo Puyo (MSX)
Puyo Puyo
Puyo Puyo Tsu

Page 2:
Puyo Puyo SUN
Puyo Puyo~n
Puyo Box
Puyo Pop

Page 3:
Puyo Puyo Fever
Puyo Puyo Fever 2
Haro no Puyo Puyo

Page 4:
Madou Monogatari
Madou Monogatari: Hanamaru Daiyouchi Enji
Waku Waku Puyo Puyo Dungeon

Page 5:
Arle no Bouken
Nazo Puyo
Super Nazo Puyo
Puyo Wars
Puyo Puyo Da!
Puyo Localizations

Discuss on the Forums!

Back to the Index