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Intro
Punch-Out!! Arcade
Super Punch-Out!! Arcade

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Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!!
Super Punch-Out!! SNES
Punch-Out!! Wii

Page 3:
Related Games
Rip-Offs
Cameos

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Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! (マイク タイソンー・パンチアウト!!) / Punch-Out!! (パンチアウト!!) - NES, Arcade, GameCube, Wii, 3DS, Wii U (1987)

Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! Cover

Punch-Out!! Cover

Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! is a bit of a departure from the arcade games. Players assume the role of Little Mac, an eighteen-year old New York City hopeful who's determined to become the greatest boxer. With the help and training of his coach Doc Louis, he will duke it out against several much larger boxers to win the title.

The look and feel of the game differs greatly from the arcade games. First of all, instead of being a wireframe character, Little Mac is just incredibly short. It kind of makes the game even more humorous, seeing how he has to pretty much jump up to punch the opponents in the face. (This was done to accommodate the NES hardware, since it wasn't quite powerful enough to replicate the arcade game.) Little Mac has the usual four punches and he can dodge left or right, duck, and only block upwards, for the opponents never hit below his face (probably due to his size). Gone is the KO meter, and strength is now regulated by a star counter. As you throw punches at your opponent, you will receive a star at certain points. Once you have obtained one, you can throw a KO punch by hitting the Start button. To get these stars, you have to time a punch just right to get them, like punching the opponent right as he's about to attack. These punches are valuable and should only be used if there is a huge opening, preferably when the opponent is stunned.

Also new is the fatigue meter, signified by hearts. Little Mac has a set number of punches he can throw before becoming tired. The counter goes down when he either misss, has his attacked blocked, blocks an opponents punch or gets hit. If the counter goes down to zero, he will become purple and unable to attack, leaving only the dodge and block. If you are hit while fatigued, you are still disabled and can not attack. Blocking moves also leaves you fatigued, but once you dodge a move, you can begin attacking again as the fatigue meter is reset. It makes the fights more challenging, but it gets in the way as you try to defeat your opponents and suddenly you can't attack because you weren't paying attention to the meter. One minor change from the arcade version - instead of opponents' eyes turning yellow, their entire bodies will flash when they're about to attack.

The last major addition comes into play when Mac is knocked down. When this happens, you have to frantically button mash to get back up and fight. The more damage that was done, the harder it is to get back up. However, the more damage you did to the opponent before, the faster you'll get back up.

The game's timer is also different, as this game introduces rounds. Each round is three minutes, but you do not have to defeat your opponent in that specific time. You are now given three rounds, so you actually have a total of nine minutes to KO your opponent. If neither character gets a KO, a decision will be made based on performance. This makes it more realistic than the arcade and SNES versions of the game, where you automatically lose the match when the time is up. In between rounds, coach Doc Louis gives a hint on how to defeat the enemy, while your opponent sits there and says something that is completely stupid and/or hilarious ("Make it quick... I want to retire." - Glass Joe). Each time a new round begins, you still have whatever stars you had in your star meter, and you and your opponent's damage is carried over as well. (Although you can "cheat" and hit select between rounds to gain a bit of health.)

The game is divided into circuits, and there's three fights per circuit. Once you have bested the final opponent in a circuit, you win the title for that and move on to the next. After each title, the game gives a little cinematic of Little Mac running through the streets of New York City in a pink sweatsuit, with Doc Louis following him on a bike, then it gives you a password so you can go back to fighting at any time. The scene with Little Mac and his coach has produced an internet fad that has spawned a song and several flash videos from sites like YTMND and Newgrounds.

A lot of characters return from the arcade games such as Glass Joe, Bald Bull, Great Tiger, and Vodka Drunkenski (renamed Soda Popinski), while new characters include Piston Honda (who is really only a Japanese version of Piston Hurricane), Don Flamenco, and fan favorite King Hippo. The main draw to the game would have to be the inclusion of Mike Tyson. He's the final match for a good reason, for he is ridiculously fast and powerful. When fighting him for the first time, it's hard to even last for fifteen seconds.

Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! was one of the many NES titles that was featured on the Playchoice 10 arcade machine. The game is exactly the same, except now you are timed on playing the game for 300 seconds for each quarter you put in. The only noticeable change is the ability to put in your initials right at the beginning.

When it came time to re-release the game, the game's star had lost his title belt. So when it came to resign the contract, Nintendo opted not to renew it (this was before his rape trial, so not related to that). Punch-Out!!'s new boss became Mr. Dream. Although different in appearance, he has the exact same moves as Mike Tyson, meaning the method of defeating him is exactly the same. It is a shame though, seeing how Mr. Dream is in no way as intimidating as Mike Tyson was. This version can be found as a bonus game in Animal Crossing for the GameCube and was used for all Virtual Console releases, but the actual cart is one of the rarer NES games to find.

Even rarer is the special gold cartridge Nintendo gave away as a prize in a Nintendo Famicom Golf US competition, which was held in June 1987. So this actually predates any of the regular versions, and it was still called just Punch Out!!. The game is mostly the same as Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!!, except it's still missing Mike Tyson himself. Once you beat Super Macho Man, the game is won. Nintendo didn't originally plan for a retail release in Japan, but the high demand made them change their mind. Both Japanese versions use a different color scheme than the Western versions, and have a bit more hilarious Engrish.

Mike Tyson's Punch Out!! is the only NES game to use the MMC2 chip. (MMCs were memory mapper chips that allowed the system to pull off effects that would otherwise be impossible for the NES.) This allowed for the huge characters seen in the game. The Japanese version uses the MMC4, although it's not clear why it uses a different chip, because there aren't any immediately noticeable differences. In fact, the whole game is still in English, even referencing the Nintendo Fun Club newsletter, which didn't exist in Japan. A few other Japanese games, like Fire Emblem, also use the MMC4 chip.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Director:

  • Genyo Takeda

Genre:

Themes:


Punch-Out!! (NES)

Punch-Out!! (NES)

Punch-Out!! (NES)

Punch-Out!! (NES)

Punch-Out!! (NES)


Additional Screenshots


Super Punch-Out!! (スーパー・パンチアウト!!) - SNES, GameCube, Wii (1994)

American Cover

Though different from the arcade game of the same name, the SNES Super Punch-Out!! is much closer to the originals than Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!!. Gone is the little boxer named Little Mac, who has been replaced by a new nameless blonde haired kid whose mission it is to win the title of the greatest World Video Boxing Association boxer. The perspective is the same as the arcade game, except your character is transparent instead of being a wireframe model. The timer has gone back to the three minute limit with one single round. There are a total of four circuits (Minor, Major, World, and Special), with the Special Circuit only becoming accessible with a record of twelve wins and zero losses. Besides the regular game mode called Championship Mode, this game features a Time Attack Mode that lets you beat your time records, which can be viewed in Records View Mode. This time, the game uses battery-backed memory instead of passwords.

The regular punches have now been tampered with in this game, as each punch has varying speed and power. From fastest to slowest, and weakest to strongest: Left Jab, Right Jab, Left Body Blow, Right Body Blow. The star KO meter has been ditched for the original KO meter, so the more blows you land, the higher your meter goes to finally deliver KO punches (uppercuts, huge body blows, and new rapid punches). New to the series is the power-up system. As time passes, the color of your character's portrait above the stamina meter changes, signifying the increase of your power. It will go from blue, to green, to yellow, and finally to red - you can also think of it as weak to strongest. When your KO meter is filled, your boxing gloves flash, while normal punches have more speed and KO punches are more powerful. You can actually change the settings of the power-up in the Button Setting Mode to change from Auto (power-up begins when power is at maximum and you throw another punch) to Manual (lets the player choose when to start power-up with a button press whenever your power is at maximum). Knowing the properties of your punches and utilizing them is key to besting the opponents.

The dodging system has been revamped as well, making this version the easiest to defend oneself. In the other games, you had to press the direction you wanted to block an attack with (Up blocking upwards, Down blocking downwards). In Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!!, you could only block upwards, anyway. Here, pressing up blocks upwards - however not pressing anything allows you block body blows automatically. It really makes the game that much easier, and gives more control about the character instead of being thrown off due to not pressing the correct directional button. You can also dodge left and right as well as duck.

Super Punch-Out!! (SNES)

Another much welcome addition is the self-healing. When you knock down the opponent and the referee is counting down, you can press any button as fast as you can to regain lost health in the battle (as usual, the enemies' punches are always much stronger than your own). You still need to mash buttons to get up after being knocked down. Don't think that the game is any easier with the added defensive and offensive options, because it's still quite difficult, especially in the final two circuits. If anything, the result is a much faster-paced game compared to the others.

The game features a diverse group of boxers to challenge. Many of them have been in previous outings, such as Bear Hugger, Piston Hurricane, Bald Bull, Mr. Sandman, Dragon Chan, but there are also a lot of new faces such as Mad Clown, Aran Ryan, Heike Kagero, Masked Muscle and the Bruiser brothers. Much like the last games, each fighter follows a certain pattern. Each of them has a huge arsenal of signature moves, whereas previous games had only around two or three moves that separated them from the other boxers. An example would be Heike Kagero, a Japanese kabuki dancer who floats around the ring with a fast dance, and hits you with his large grey hair. Or Mad Clown, who at one point does black flips to the back of the ring, juggles balls, and then throws them at you - all before jumping forwards and attempting to smack your head and knock you down with a single attack. Or a match up against Hoy Quarlow, a 78-year old martial artist, who literally beats the living tar out of you with his walking stick. Despite the frustration with some of these cheesy attacks, it lends even more to the personality of the series (get knocked down from Super Macho Man and watch him flex the entire time you're down. It's ridiculous). Your opponent's coaches will even yell tips at them, telling them to either attack or take it easy. These should be a sign that they're about to lay a huge attack on you, so dodge or attack accordingly.

This game was criticized by fans of the NES game for being too different. What people didn't realize, though, is that this version was closer to the original spirit of the arcade games. If anything, Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! is the only game in the series that deviates from the norm.

For a few years, Super Punch Out!! was an American/European exclusive game - it was initially released in 1994, and didn't come out in Japan until 1998. The game was only sold through the "Nintendo Power" vending system, where you would purchase a blank cartridge, and pay to have various games written on to it.

Super Punch Out!! has also made an appearance in the recent EA boxing game Fight Night Round 2. Since the GameCube version lacks the online modes of the Xbox and PS2 versions, EA gave GameCube owners the ability to play Super Punch-Out!! in the game. It's actually emulated very well, and is definitely a welcome bonus to an already great boxing game. You can even unlock the fighter from Super Punch-Out!! for the modes in Fight Night Round 2 in all 3D glory. The game has him wearing shorts that say "MAC" on them, implying that the boxer is Little Mac, which is incorrect (again, in Super Punch-Out!! he did not have a name).

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Producer:

  • Genyo Takeda

Director:

  • Makoto Wada

Genre:

Themes:


Super Punch-Out!! (SNES)

Super Punch-Out!! (SNES)

Super Punch-Out!! (SNES)

Super Punch-Out!! (SNES)

Super Punch-Out!! (SNES)

Super Punch-Out!! (SNES)


Additional Screenshots


Punch-Out!! (パンチアウト!!) - Wii (2008)

Japanese Cover

American Cover

After fifteen years, Nintendo finally decided to revitalize the Punch-Out!! franchise. Given to the Canadian development team Next Level Games after the success of the Super Mario Strikers series, the game isn't so much a remake as it is a full on upgrade taking elements from each and every Punch-Out!! before, with the most inspiration drawn from the NES game. Yet again players take control of Little Mac, the little boxer who could. With the return of his coach Doc Louis, it is time to set the world on fire again and battle it out in three circuits to take the title of greatest boxer in the world.

The game has the same setup and some mechanics as the NES game: three 3 minute rounds to try and knock out your opponent. You fight every boxer and when you become the champ, you have to defend your title much like before, and defeat ever boxer yet again. The fatigue meter is back with the hearts showing you how many times you can miss / have your attacks blocked before Little Mac has to rest and can't throw anymore punches. Also making a return is the star counter system, which works similarly as it did in the NES version. However, instead of stacking up to three super moves, it allows you to perform a single super punch of varying strengths. Getting hit also drains all stars instead of just one. It is a bit easier to obtain stars, though. The best defensive maneuver from the SNES version of mashing buttons during downed opponents to regain health also makes a glorious return.

The game has multiple configurations, with the much lauded one of using the nunchuk attachment and holding the input devices as if you are actually boxing. It feels natural and is surprisingly accurate. However, due to the fast paced nature of the game its not entirely useful. For the best reaction time with punches, you'll end up just holding the Wii remote sideways and playing it like a NES controller. The Wii balance board can also be used, with leaning left and right to dodge and shifting your weight in the back to duck. This unfortunately is also a gimmick and most people's reaction time in real life is nowhere near the speed of the game, so you will just get hit a lot.

Adding to the nostalgia is the return of the more popular boxers from past Punch-Out!! games. Many boxers make their triumphiant return after not being seen since the NES version like King Hippo, Von Kaiser, and Great Tiger. The selection of past boxers is perfect (although the Super Punch-Out!! debutants are mostly missing, with the exception of Aran Ryan), with each one realised in true 3D. While this will make most fans of the series squeal with glee, it's the infused personalities that really take center stage. Every action and word said (which is spoken in their native tongue!) has been well thought out to make every boxer come to life, like Great Tiger flying into the ring on his magic carpet, or when Bald Bull slides his feet in anger much like a bull before he charges. It makes every character seem over the top and stereotypical, but in turn makes it easy to love all ofthem even when beating them to a pulp. There's also lots of great artwork of the opponents getting ready for the fight.

The Wii version also features two new boxers, one being the well-known Nintendo icon Donkey Kong, and the other one is Disco Kid. His appearance in the game is amusing and he fits so well with the rest of the cast that it's almost as if he could have been from an earlier title. While Disco Kid is great and so many lovable boxers return, it is a little odd and sad that almost all of the characters are from past games. Why couldn't Next Level Games create even more new boxers?

Besides the regular career mode of the usual boxing, there is also an exhibition mode with many challenges that are just absolutely ridiculous. Expert players need only apply. Also added for the first time in the series history is a head-to-head two player mode. Here, you both control two Little Macs in split screen and try to punch the other the most and fill up your meter. Once filled, the winning player becomes Giga Mac and switches to the typical single screen setup. From there, Little Mac must face off against Giga Mac as it turns into a typical Punch-Out!! match. These games were never about multiplayer at all, but this mode certainly made it creative at least. There's also a practice mode that lets you face a holographic version of each of your foes.

All in all, this is a great reimagening of the classig series. The graphics are obviously fantastic, with huge, cel-shaded characters and incredibly charismatic animation. All of the music themes are remixes of the main theme from Punch-Out!!. The theme during the regular game is played on guitar and it has a cool '80s rock feel to it, and it changes with each circuit. What's particularly cool is that each enemy has his own unique arrangement of the theme.

In October 2009, Nintendo released Doc Louis's Punch-Out!! on WiiWare, as an exclusive reward for Club Nintendo platinum members. Using the Punch-Out!! engine, all that you can do here is fight or spar with Doc Louis himself.

Quick Info:

Developer:

  • First Level Games

Publisher:

Director:

  • Jason Carr
    Mike Inglehart

Genre:

Themes:


Punch-Out!! (Wii)

Punch-Out!! (Wii)

Punch-Out!! (Wii)

Punch-Out!! (Wii)

Punch-Out!! (Wii)

Punch-Out!! (Wii)

Punch-Out!! (Wii)


Additional Screenshots


Cutscenes


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Page 1:
Intro
Punch-Out!! Arcade
Super Punch-Out!! Arcade

Page 2:
Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!!
Super Punch-Out!! SNES
Punch-Out!! Wii

Page 3:
Related Games
Rip-Offs
Cameos

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