<table> <tr> <td class=headerlogo> <p class=image><a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net" target="_parent"><img alt="Logo by MP83" src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/logo/hg101logo.png"></a></p> </td> <td> <table class=headerright> <tr> <td class=headermenu> <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/alpha.htm" target="_parent">Articles</a> | <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/features.htm" target="_parent">Features</a> | <a href="http://blog.hardcoregaming101.net" target="_parent">Blog</a> | <a href="http://hg101.proboards.com/" target="_parent">Forums</a> | <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/about.htm" target="_parent">About</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hardcore-Gaming-101/109837535712670" target="_blank"><img alt=" " src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/facebook.png"></a>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/HG_101" target="_blank"><img alt=" " src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/twitter.png"></a> </td> <td class=searchbox> <form action="http://www.google.com/cse" id="cse-search-box" target="_parent"> <div> <input type="hidden" name="cx" value="partner-pub-5230184257141993:xfg3mydy24k"> <input type="hidden" name="ie" value="ISO-8859-1"> <input type="text" name="q" size="30"> <input type="submit" name="sa" value="Search"> </div> </form> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.google.com/coop/cse/brand?form=cse-search-box&amp;lang=en"></script> </td> </tr> </table> <table class=headerad> <tr> <td> <script type="text/javascript"><!-- google_ad_client = "pub-5230184257141993"; /* HG101 */ google_ad_slot = "4961941287"; google_ad_width = 728; google_ad_height = 90; //--> </script> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js"> </script> </td> </tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table>

<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Arcade / Famicom / MSX

Page 2:
SNES / Super Famicom

Page 3:
PlayStation

Page 4:
Nintendo 64

Page 5:
Portables

Page 6:
Spin-offs

Page 7:
Other

Back to the Index


Ganbare Goemon: Neo Momoyama Bakufu no Odori (がんばれゴエモンネオ桃山幕府のおどり) / Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon - Nintendo 64 (1997)

American Cover

European Cover

After a prolonged absence, Goemon finally returns to American shores, this time with his real name intact. The first Nintendo 64 game is a fully 3D affair, and while it's aged better than some other 3D games of the day (more so than, say, Castlevania), it's still pretty clunky. The graphics are a blurry mess, the framerate is terribly inconsistent, and the terrain is flat and boring. Since your weapons are so short, it's sometimes hard to hit bad guys, and trying to attack with projectiles is an exercise in futility. The characters generally control well, except you really have to push hard on the analog stick to get them to run. The camera has its share of problems too - it's completely out of your control, and many times you just have to wait until its reorients itself before you can go any further. Thankfully, the game isn't very difficult, so none of these problems make it too frustrating.

Known as Neo Momoyama Bakufu no Odori in Japan ("Dance of the New Peach Mountain Shoguns"), Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon goes back to the adventure stylings of Goemon 3 SFC, except this time it's even more Zelda-like. The dungeons revolve around finding keys, although the emphasis is more on platforming than puzzle solving. There are even items to give you a map and show you where the boss is located. The Impact sequences are back, and now fully 3D. You're even given an extending pipe that lets you reel in enemies close and attack them.

In spite of its quirks, Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon was awesome just because it was finally another Goemon game, in English. The translators probably had no idea how to handle the humor, because much of the dialogue makes absolutely no sense, but it does add to the charm. The laugh track from Goemon 3 is also back, lending to the sheer absurdity of the writing. The main bad guy is a fellow named Dancin', who wants to turn the entire land of Japan into his stage. He dislikes Goemon's name and calls him "Fernandez", while Ebisumaru is dubbed "Antonio". He also breaks out into song randomly. His henchmen are fruity chaps named Baron and Colon, who are completely oblivious to how ridiculous they look. Even the villagers in the towns have random bits of amusing dialogue. It makes you wonder how much you're missing out on the writing in the other games. There are tons of other bits of silliness too - like turning into a Super Saiyan (it could be done in Goemon 3 SFC but it's much more amusing here) or visiting the Fortune Teller, who screams out "PLASMA!!!" for no good reason.

Even though the graphics and gameplay are a little dated, the music stills holds up pretty well, with lots of high quality, catchy tunes. Most impressive are the vocal songs, used for the intro and Goemon Impact sequences, sung by Dragon Ball Z vocalist Hironobu Kageyama and Mazinger Z vocalist Ichirou Mizuki, respectively. In the original Japanese version, the prologue (where Ebisumaru tries to get a discount at a store by stripping) was fully voiced, but this was removed from the Western releases. Other than some small changes here and there - the manji blocks have become star blocks, and the Wise Man's porn mags have turned into car mags - the game stays pretty close to its Japanese heritage. One of the villagers even remarks that you can learn a lot about ancient Japanese geography from the locations you visit.

Back in the day - you know, before Ocarina of Time came out - Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon was pretty damn good, not least because it was the only vaguely RPG-ish game N64 fans could hold onto. Nowdays, it's a little lacking, but the goofiness of N64 Goemon makes it well worth a playthrough.


Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon

Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon

Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon

Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon


Intro

Additional Screenshots


Ganbare Goemon: Derodero Dōchu Obake Tenkomori (がんばれゴエモンでろでろ道中 オバケてんこ盛り) / Goemon's Great Adventure / Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon 2 - Nintendo 64 (1999)

American Cover

European Cover

Goemon's second N64 game still uses polygons, but returns the action back where it belongs: the second dimension. Konami had finally mastered the N64 by this era, and the graphics look gorgeous, without any of the blurry textures or foggy landscapes the system had become known for. It also runs far smoother than its predecessor. While the gameplay is 2D, the landscapes are rendered three dimensional, much like the Klonoa games, which lends a fantastic amount of depth to the backgrounds.

The map screen is back, although you can't simply run straight through it. Taking inspiration from the Famicom Goemon titles, you must collect a certain number of passes before you can enter the final stage of each map. You get a pass for beating a level, but you also find them by completing a variety of mini-quests. Most of these involve replaying levels with a specific task (find a certain number of items, kill a certain number of bad guys, win a race, etc), although some scattered throughout the stages as well. Luckily, there are always extra passes to be found, so you don't need to complete all of the challenges to move on. Sometimes triggering these subquests can be annoying, since you have to run through towns and talk to everyone to find out what to do, but you're given a dash manuever that lets you tear through villages at lightspeed.

Goemon's Great Adventure (N64)

You can't switch between characters at any time, unfortunately - you're only allowed to swap at designated spots, where you're transported to the "Tea House In Another Dimenson", a silly place filled with sci-fi noises and strange electrickery. At least a second player can joyn at any time, and both players can even piggyback each other. Since Goemon has a double-jump, you'll probably be playing as him most of the time, as he makes the platfotming much easier.

The major bad guys are also throwbacks to old Goemon games. The Wise Old Man has invented a machine to resurrect the dead (primarily to cavort with Marilyn Monroe) when it is stolen by the evil floating nun Bismaru. (S)he wants to summon an army of zombies to please her master, Dochuki, the leader of the underworld. One of the returning bad guys is Kabuki 64, an upgraded version of an enemy from Goemon 2 for Super Famicom. You'll also meet a mysterious cat girl named Suzaku, but the coolest new character is Miss Impact, a gigantic robot vaguely patterned after Omi-chan. Her role makes the Impact battles a bit more interesting, as you can now switch viewpoints between the two robots and fight bad guys together.

While the game isn't necessarily more difficult than the others in the series, you can only take three hits before you die, unless you're wearing special protection. But it doesn't deter from the gameplay - the amazing graphics and levels help make this one of the best of the series, trailing only behind Goemon 4 SFC. For anyone who's getting tired of the heroes wearing the same outfits over and over again, there's three alternate costumes for each character to unlock. And it's in English too. The only problem? They kept the voices in the prologue (and they're still in Japanese), but axed the opening song (and the whole intro music clip along with it). Why, Konami, why?

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Genre:

Themes:


Goemon's Great Adventure (N64)

Goemon's Great Adventure (N64)

Goemon's Great Adventure (N64)

Goemon's Great Adventure (N64)


Japanese Intro Screenshots


Additional Screenshots


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Arcade / Famicom / MSX

Page 2:
SNES / Super Famicom

Page 3:
PlayStation

Page 4:
Nintendo 64

Page 5:
Portables

Page 6:
Spin-offs

Page 7:
Other

Back to the Index