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Page 1:
Intro
Ghosts 'n Goblins

Page 2:
Ghouls 'n Ghosts
Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts

Page 3:
Makaimura for Wonderswan
Ultimate Ghosts 'n Goblins
Ghosts 'n Goblins: Gold Knights

Page 4:
Gargoyle's Quest
Gargoyle's Quest II
Demon's Crest

Page 5:
Maximo
Maximo vs The Army of Zin

Page 6:
Nazo Makaimura
Makaimura Online
Magyechon Online
Cameos

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Ghouls 'n Ghosts / 大魔界村 (Daimakaimura) - Arcade, Genesis, SuperGrafx, Master System, Commodore 64, Amstrad CPC, Amiga, Atari ST, X68000, Saturn, PlayStation, ZX Spectrum, PlayStation 2, Xbox, PSP, Mobile (1988)

American Arcade Flyer

Japanese Mega Drive Cover

IBM PC Cover

X68000 Cover

Ghouls 'n Ghosts (Dai Makaimura in Japan) takes place three years after Ghosts 'n Goblins. While Arthur is away from the castle it gets ambushed by winged gargoyles who take Princess Prin-Prin hostage, yet again. It doesn't take an expert to see where this is going. Even after all that trouble he went through to rescue her last time, Arthur doesn't even momentarily hesitate to come to her rescue again. He's just that nice a guy. As Arthur and Princess Prin-Prin approach each other in front of the castle's walls, a beam strikes Princess Prin-Prin and then vaporizes Arthur's horse(!!!) A giant monster appears above and kidnaps Princess Prin-Prin, and Arthur sets out to rescue her again, this time from the evil Loki (Lucifer in the Japanese version).

Ghouls 'n Ghosts (Arcade)

Maybe Arthur figured that saving Princess Prin-Prin was going to be easy this time (not very likely). If you assumed that Capcom wasn't going to pull that same crap they did last time, well then you are in for a spirit-destroying disappointment. You still have to find an ultimate weapon to beat the final boss a second time, and once again, you have to beat the entire game twice. I hope you have a sense of humor, because otherwise that might be a bit much. Overall, it's just slightly easier than the first game, but it actually has the more difficult first level of the two, so making any real advancement at all is pretty damn hard. There are slightly more enemies on screen at any given time and they frequently get pretty big, even in the first level. It can be a bit overwhelming to have more foes and obstacles than you could possibly deal with coming at you from all sides for so much of the game, so don't hesitate to avoid enemies entirely and run like crazy instead (a good strategy for the entire series, actually).

Having been made in 1988, when platformers were by far the most popular genre in video games, platforming is more developed and factors more prominently into the gameplay compared to the predecessor. Ghouls 'n Ghosts controls the same as the first game, except that you can attack directly upward and, while airborne, downward. The arsenal has been greatly expanded via a few minor changes. Each standard weapon from the original game is still available, but the ultimate weapon to beat the final boss is different. There are also two original weapons—a spiked discus that hugs the dirt, and a sword that can't be thrown and is only good for attacking at close range. What really makes Ghouls 'n Ghosts' weapon system so exceptional, though, is a golden suit of armor that Arthur can find when he is already wearing his standard armor. It gives Arthur the ability to charge up his weapon for a high powered attack that's completely different from any of his standard shots, and varies depending on which weapon he's currently using. Weapon and armor drops are more plentiful, and there are even hidden treasure chests scattered practically everywhere.

Ghouls 'n Ghosts runs on Capcom's CPS-1 arcade system, which means the game looks a lot nicer, and was arguably the best looking platformer at the time of its release, its designs in the genre rivaled only by Castlevania. It has the same basic creepy look as the original, but it's much more detailed. Other than the first game, Ghouls 'n Ghosts gives its back- and foregrounds plenty of animations, like lightning and rain in the first level. The backgrounds themselves look fantastic and are even more light-heartedly morbid, with plenty of skeletons and corpses lieing around throughout the game. Arthur doesn't turn into a frog anymore, but there is a wizard that pops out of treasure chests and changes him into a duck (if he's wearing armor) or an elderly man with a cane (if he's just in his boxers). It also has great music composed by Tamayo Kawamoto.

Ghouls 'n Ghosts (Arcade)

Ghouls 'n Ghosts originated in the arcades, but more commonly known was the Genesis port. This version is identical, gameplay-wise, but has the necessary modifications made for the hardware. It has been made the slightest bit easier by giving it more restart points, several difficulty settings, and the ability to continue infinite times. You can also change directions when crouched, which actually makes the game notably easier—in the arcade version, you had to stand up, turn around, and then crouch back down. It also has a cheat mode where you can slow down the game, play it in Japanese, make Arthur invulnerable (you will be amazed at how difficult the game is even then), or select which level to begin at. Given that the game is essentially impossible without these cheats, this is easily the best version of the game and arguably the best platformer on the console. There was also a port to the Japan-only NEC Supergrafx, which plays pretty well, and looks pretty decent. But the colors are off, and the music isn't too hot either. However, the Genesis version has some simplified backgrounds in certain areas, which are intact in the Supergrafx version. The Supergrafx port also limits the credits, opposed to the infinite continuing on the Genesis.

A severely modified port was released for Sega Master System. Certain treasure chests have doors that lead to places where you can acquire different weapons or upgrade Arthur's helmet, chestplate, or boots. Boots will make Arthur run faster and jump higher, and chestplates will allow him to take more damage. Helmets give Arthur access to completely original magic spells, which are independent of the weapon currently used. These range from more powerful versions of the charged-up weapons from the arcade version, to temporary invulnerability, to a spell that regenerates Arthur's armor. These spells can only be cast a limited amount of times before a MP meter is depleted, but a few of the doors lead to places where Arthur can replenish MP or regenerate his armor. The sword and torch have been removed and replaced by a very powerful fireball weapon. Other than a few enemies being eliminated, the levels play pretty much identically, except each is divided into three sections—the first and second are divided by their restart points, and the third is the boss fight. A few of the bosses had their attack patterns changed as well. Its music is much more faithful than would be expected given the hardware, but its graphics are pretty poor. This port is by far the easiest version of the game (without cheats), and the many changes that have been made are certainly interesting. The controls are also not as good as the arcade or Genesis versions, but it's a decent enough port. As if to fit in with the rest of the Master System library, the box shows a hilarious, intentionally poorly-drawn variant of the Genesis cover.

The versions for Commodore 64, Atari ST, and Amiga have more original music by Tim Follin. The Amstrad CPC and ZX Spectrum versions are pure crap in every respect. The X68000 version, like most Capcom arcade ports for the system, is almost pixel perfect to the arcade. Other faithful conversions have been released for Saturn and PlayStation as on Capcom Generations Vol.2, for PlayStation 2 and Xbox as part of the Capcom Classics Collection, and for PlayStation Portable with the Capcom Classics Collection Reloaded.

Ghouls 'n Ghosts (Arcade)


Ghouls 'n Ghosts (Arcade)

Ghouls 'n Ghosts (Arcade)

Ghouls 'n Ghosts (Arcade)

Ghouls 'n Ghosts (Arcade)

Ghouls 'n Ghosts (Arcade)

Ghouls 'n Ghosts (Arcade)


Comparison Screenshots


Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts / 超魔界村 (Chohmakaimura) - SNES, PlayStation, Saturn, PlayStation 2, Xbox, PSP, Mobile (1991)

American Cover

Japanese Cover

Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts is the third and best entry in the Ghosts 'n Goblins series. It begins with Arthur running past villagers who are watching a fireworks display while on his way to the castle to see Princess Prin-Prin. Arthur obviously is a patient guy. After everything he dealt with in those last two outings he still sticks around. Most (sane) people would have been gone a long time ago, but Arthur is loyal like that. After he meets up with the Princess in the castle, the pair embraces. It's easy to guess what's coming. Their happiness is abruptly interrupted when a gargantuan winged monster breaks through the castle's window and kidnaps Princess Prin-Prin. What does Arthur do? Arthur immediately goes to rescue her with complete disregard for his own safety, for the third time. How could anybody not like this guy!? Honestly, why doesn't Princess Prin-Prin get some proper guards? Despite how badass Arthur must be to have lasted this long, he obviously isn't very good at preventing her from getting kidnapped.

Arthur either has no hesitation to pit himself against challenges of any degree of intensity or he's just way too optimistic, because Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts is also absurdly difficult like its two predecessors. In all fairness, it is the easiest game of the three, but of course that's strictly relative. Expect to be driven completely insane if you put any real effort toward the task of actually trying to finish the game. Enemy patterns have been made ever so slightly less impossible to deal with, so it is a bit more "fair". On the other hand, Capcom have actually accomplished the feat of making Red Arremer even more difficult to deal with than in the rest of the series. He'll avoid all attacks, and only swoop down into range when it puts him at as little risk as possible, but he can be dealt with a bit easier if you have the bow and arrows. Having originated on a console rather than in the arcades like the previous two, there is an options mode to select a difficulty level and how many lives to begin with, and it's possible to continue after a Game Over. That pure insanity where you have to beat the entire freaking game twice and defeat the true final boss—a bastard named Sardius (or Samael, in the Japanese version)—with a difficult-to-find ultimate weapon the second time is still present, so don't expect any more breaks than in the prior installments.

Platforming is an even bigger part of Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts than it was in Ghouls 'n Ghosts. The controls are more like the original game, in that you can no longer fire up or down, but you also have an amazingly beneficial double jump technique that also allows to change directions for the second jump. The weapon system has been changed and expanded slightly. Arthur still has his torch, lance, dagger, and axe, as well as a bow and arrows, a scythe, and a huge blade thing. There is still an ultimate weapon that's available during your second time through the game, but it has been changed yet again. Arthur's armor is now upgraded in two steps, he first has to get a green armor before the golden one shows up. The gold armor will still allow you to power up any default weapon, and the green armor gives access to a different and more powerful version of that weapon, without any charging up required. This effectively doubles the size of the arsenal and can make certain generally less useful weapons (like the torch or bow and arrows) much more effective. There are still plenty of hidden treasure chests to be found by jumping or double jumping at specific locations. The wizard that hides in treasure chests is back, and he'll change Arthur into an infant (no armor), a seal (standard armor), a bee (green armor), or a young woman (gold armor).

Despite the lower resolution of the SNES, the graphics here are still better than the previous titles. The game begins at the same graveyard that every installment does, but it's even better detailed than before. The zombies that rise out of the ground come up still in their coffins, then march out of them toward Arthur. In the second quarter of the first level, there's a section where skulls pour out of the mouths of giant statues and the ground rises and falls with visible mounds of skulls beneath it, accompanied by a delightfully creepy 16-bit noise. Rain shows up in the foreground briefly later, and there's a section where Arthur has to avoid getting swept away by massive waves that take up half the screen and wipe out huge chunks of the landscape. It's a great looking game throughout, and the backgrounds and monsters are easily among the best designed in a series with plenty of exceptional examples of both. Its music, however, is even better than the graphics. Every composition perfectly compliments its light-hearted-creepiness-aesthetic and works fantastically on its own as well. Honestly, this game is probably worth playing once for its presentation alone.

After the original SNES version, it has also been re-released with the predecessors for PlayStation and Saturn on Capcom Generation Vol. 2, for PlayStation 2 and Xbox on Capcom Classics Collection, and for PlayStation Portable on Capcom Classics Collection Reloaded. Like the previous games, Chohmakaimura also received a mobile phone port, but only in Japan.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Designer:

  • Tatsuya Minami
  • Kimio Yamazoe

Genre:

Themes:


Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts

Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts

Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts

Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts

Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts



Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts / 超魔界村 R (Chohmakaimura R) - Game Boy Advance (2001)

American Cover

Japanese Cover

With the release of the Game Boy Advance, several companies started porting their old SNES games to the portable format. Capcom, well known for milking their franchises, brought out Final Fight, Megaman and Bass, Breath of Fire, and of course Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts. Unlike most of their other portable versions, however, this is more than just a straight conversion. (The game is titled "Chohmakaimura R" in Japan to differentiate, the "R" meaning "Revival" or "Revision".)

The Original mode just like the SNES game. The new Arrange mode, however, is more interesting, and gives you three different paths through the game, depending on what kind of armor (if any) you have equipped when you beat a stage. The "Easy" route is just like the original game. The "Medium" path consists of redone versions of stages from previous games. The second stage, for instance, is taken from the second level of Ghouls 'n Ghosts. The third stage is a revamped version of the fourth stage from Ghosts 'n Goblins. The fourth stage is a remix of the classic first level from Ghosts 'n Goblins. Many of these levels, mostly the ones from the first game, have updated graphics and extra additions. For instance, the first Ghosts 'n Goblins stage features a huge ball of skeletons that replaces the moon in the sky. Later in the level, it disappears and smashes into the floor, taking reckless knights with it. All of these levels have brand new bosses as well. "Hard" consists of more difficult versions of the Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts levels.

Unfortunately, the smaller screen size makes the game even more difficult, especially when dealing with offscreen enemies, and the music suffers a bit compared to the SNES version. There's some annoying slowdown too. On the plus side, there's now a save function, even at checkpoints midlevel, so it makes this massive undertaking a bit more palatable. Overall, it's great to see that Capcom added a lot to this version instead of just making a straight port.

Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts (GBA)

Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts (GBA)

Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts (GBA)

Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts (GBA)

Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts (GBA)


Comparison Screenshots


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Intro
Ghosts 'n Goblins

Page 2:
Ghouls 'n Ghosts
Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts

Page 3:
Makaimura for Wonderswan
Ultimate Ghosts 'n Goblins
Ghosts 'n Goblins: Gold Knights

Page 4:
Gargoyle's Quest
Gargoyle's Quest II
Demon's Crest

Page 5:
Maximo
Maximo vs The Army of Zin

Page 6:
Nazo Makaimura
Makaimura Online
Magyechon Online
Cameos

Back to the Index