<table> <tr> <td class=headerlogo> <p class=image><a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net" target="_parent"><img src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/logo/hg101logo.png" alt="Logo by MP83"></a></p> </td> <td> <table class=headerright> <tr> <td class=headermenu> <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/alpha.htm" target="_parent">Articles</a> | <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/features.htm" target="_parent">Features</a> | <a href="http://blog.hardcoregaming101.net" target="_parent">Blog</a> | <a href="http://hg101.proboards.com/" target="_parent">Forums</a> | <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/about.htm" target="_parent">About</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hardcore-Gaming-101/109837535712670" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/facebook.png"></a>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/HG_101"><img src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/twitter.png" target="_blank"></a> </td> <td class=searchbox> <form action="http://www.google.com/cse" id="cse-search-box" target="_parent"> <div> <input type="hidden" name="cx" value="partner-pub-0596905340593187:3048719537" /> <input type="hidden" name="ie" value="ISO-8859-1" /> <input type="text" name="q" size="30" /> <input type="submit" name="sa" value="Search" /> </div> </form> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.google.com/coop/cse/brand?form=cse-search-box&amp;lang=en"></script> </td> </tr> </table> <table class=headerad> <tr> <td> <script type="text/javascript"><!-- google_ad_client = "pub-0596905340593187"; /* HG101 */ google_ad_slot = "1388153503"; google_ad_width = 728; google_ad_height = 90; //--> </script> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js"> </script> </td> </tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table>

<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Intro
Main Composers

Page 2:
Beatmania
2ndMix
3rdMix
CompleteMix

Page 3:
4thMix
Append Gottamix
5thMix
CompleteMix2

Page 4:
Beatmania III
ClubMix
Dreams Come True
Best Hits

Page 5:
European Edit
Append Gottamix2
Core Remix
The Sound of Tokyo!

Page 6:
6thMix
7thMix
The Final
Beatmania (2006)

Page 7:
Game Boy Color
WonderSwan
Beatmania Pocket

Page 8:
BeatmaniaIIDX series
Beatmania Da!! series
Cameos
Ripoffs

Back to the Index


beatmaniaIIDX series - Arcade, PlayStation 2 (1999-current)

2nd Style Poster

10th Style Poster

This "sequel" of sorts to Beatmania first debuted a month after CompleteMix hit arcades, sporting many updates and changes. The first major change was the addition of an extra black and white key, resulting in 7 Keys in total. The Player 1 side had its turntable placed on the left side, which proved benefitial for some players. The arcade machine also had a big 40 inch widescreen monitor and played videos from a DVD instead of animated bitmaps during the game. The cabinet itself was renovated to be bigger and flashier, especially the deluxe cabs, where the "DX" in the title comes from. The Deluxe cab is framed in metal support structure with a platform to stand on, giving the machine a more authentic club stage feel. The panels also include controls and equalizer dials to adjust effects and volumes.

As for the game itself, there are options to play 5-Keys or all 7-Keys, with the earliest titles also having 4-Key play using just the white buttons. Thanks to the added space of widescreen, the black keys were given their own separate lanes for easier line reading. Over time the difficulty far exceeded the original Beatmania's, with some charts topping at 2000 or more notes. In general IIDX is one of if not the hardest rhythm games of all time, thanks to its 8 inputs and unforgiving timing and groove gauge.

The first release had a rocky start, with a songlist consisting of music from the first two 5-Key mixes and only a dozen or so new songs or remixes. Players at first weren't too impressed with replaying many of the same tunes as before with mere superficial upgrades. Even the early full-motion videos for many of the songs consisted of the same animations from the 5-Key series, camera footage of dancers in the street or random imagery. In short order many players migrated back to the regular series when 4thMix came out.

In a bold effort, Konami decided to spurn interest in IIDX by linking machines up with the then super popular Dance Dance Revolution 2ndMix. The updated machines, given the full title Dance Dance Revolution 2ndMIX with BeatmaniaIIDX Club Version, made it possible for DDR players to play 13 songs on Basic difficuly chosen from players on the linked IIDX machines. A later upgrade was given to both machines, called in full Dance Dance Revolution 2ndMix with beatmaniaIIDX Substream Club Version2. This upgrade expanded IIDX's songlist by 11 tracks, most of them taken from 5-Key Beatmania and DDR, and enabled the DDR players to play all but one song from IIDX Substream on any difficulty. In practice, the link play was a neat diversion, but ultimately fizzled out, as none of the available Club Version tunes ever reappeared in an arcade DDR release again until DDR Extreme. However, it helped keep IIDX afloat through its next release BeatmaniaIIDX 2nd Style, where it gained artist Goli to give the series a unique look and ongoing assorted DJ characters which would become popular in their own right later on as their roster grew. By 3rd Style, IIDX had become a big enough hit to have its first of many home ports onto PlayStation 2, and it continued to grow until it overshadowed its predecessor, with 8th Style becoming the first arcade IIDX title to succeed the end of the original 5-Key Beatmania. The 17th update, named Sirius, added hold notes and backspin scratches, which were similar to the full spin scratches from Beatmania 7thMix but added spinning in the opposite direction at the end of the notebar. In late 2012 its 21st arcade release, BeatmaniaIIDX 20 Tricoro, became the first Beatmania game made in 720p high definition.

Though it bears the same name and basic gameplay, IIDX doesn't carry much of the same music as its 5-Key predecessor beyond the first release, Substream, and the arcade and home versions of 4th Style. Outside of that, there is a scant amount of remixes like "E-Motion 2003 -Romantic Extra-," "U Gotta Groove -Extend Joy Style-," and "More Deep (ver.2.1)." Truth be told, DDR has more songs and remixes taken or based on 5-Key Beatmania in its library than IIDX does. In many ways, this sequel series is its own beast with newer and a shifted pool of talent, with much new blood from the club scene and doujin world like Y&Co., dj Remo-Con, Ryu☆, Kors K, Redalice, DJ Chucky, Usao, DJ Genki, Jakazid and more. Many composers in the industry have lent a song or two into the mix like Hideki Naganuma, Manabu Namiki, Akira Yamaoka, and Michiru Yamane to name a few. In celebration of the 10th anniversary of the Bemani franchise, the home version of IIDX 13 DistorteD included 6 of the most popular tunes from the 5-Key franchise, and continued such inclusions for the next 2 PS2 ports. Currently, the only songs left remaining from the original series in the latest arcade IIDX releases are "Deep In You," "Rugged Ash," and "Genom Screams" from Beatmania 4thMix along with "Jam & Marmalade" and "Mnemoniq" from Beatmania III.

beatmaniaIIDX 10th style (Arcade)

beatmaniaIIDX 11 Red (Arcade)

beatmaniaIIDX 16 Empress (Arcade)

beatmaniaIIDX 19 Lincle (Arcade)

beatmaniaIIDX 20 tricoro (Arcade)


beatmania DA!! series - Windows, Macintosh, PlayStation (2000-2002)

Japanese PlayStation 2 Cover

Much like The Typing of the Dead, the DA!! titles are Beatmania ports converted into typing teaching tools. Along with hitting keyboard keys in specific lanes like the main series, you're given specific words or phrases to type in the allotted time at various parts of the song. Two releases were made for the PC and Mac, and a version for PlayStation 2 which came with its own USB keyboard. The songlists are all fairly small, with a scant handful of new songs like "Beauty," "The Kuma-San" and a Tokimeki Memorial track. It's an odd take on the franchise (there's a Pop'n Music version, too), but not as hilarious a juxaposition as typing to kill zombies.

beatmaniaDA!! (Windows)

beatmaniaDA!! (Windows)


Cameos

Seeing the broad spread of the many Bemani titles, it should come as no surprise that many songs from the series would make their way to other titles. Even starting with the release of

Pop'n Music in September 1998, the first crossover appeared as a hidden track: "E-Motion." Since then, a slew of tunes would crop up in almost every title in one form or another, even garnering exclusive remixes like the "D.D.R." version of "20, November" on Dance Dance Revolution 2ndMix or "Feeling of love -Super Euro Version-" on ParaParaParadise. Most of the 5-Key songs would appear in easy-to-port mass quantities of Pop'n and DDR thanks in large part to home version versions like Ultramix or the short-lived ee'mall service.

On the non-music side, some of the visualizations would appear in such titles as the first BeatmaniaIIDX, Dance Maniax 2ndMix, and DDR Extreme. Uncle Jam, the character from jam jam reggae, appeared in the first Pop'n Music and made subsequent reappearances throughout the series. In addition, Kinoko Boy from ClubMix debuted as a character for the crossovers "321Stars" in Pop'n Music 8 and "Linn1999" in Ee'mall 2nd Avenue.

A few little shout-outs also appear in non-rhythm Konami games. The first town you visit in Goemon's Great Adventure has a very out-of-place DJ visitor named Beat Mania for whom you need to find his missing LP, mic and headphones. One of the frames for the Gun del Sol in Boktai is also called Beatmania. While its doesn't harm enemies, its musical sonar is able to lure or stun them for a brief period.

Compared to its Bemani brother DDR, Beatmania was never a pop culture behemoth, certainly not getting its own movie like La máquina de bailar. Its most prominent machine cameo was in the music video of Everything but the Girl's "Five Fathoms" where Ben Watt of the duo walks up and plays a Hiphopmania cab in an arcade, showing brief flashes of "U Gotta Groove," "DJ Battle," and "Jam Jam Reggae" - though there's much more footage of the many players on the Dancing Stage machine, and even Time Crisis 2 and Star Wars Arcade. The song had a special cut made for BeatmaniaIIDX 3rd Style, with the video edited to focus almost exclusively on the Bemani titles. Surprisingly, a Beatmania machine shows up on the HQ set of Power Rangers RPM, with the marquee changed to the legally distinct name "Beat the DJ."

pop'n music (Arcade)

Dance Dance Revolution 3rdMIX (PlayStation)



Rip-offs

Ez2DJ series - Arcade, Windows (1999-current)

2nd Trax Machine

Ez2DJ is an interesting clone of Beatmania by AmuseWorld, sort of merging aspects of all 3 formats: The game uses 5 keys like regular Beatmania, boosted video capabilities and the turntable layouts of IIDX, and foot pedals like III. In addition, 5 effector keys were laid out to tune and distort the sound in multiple ways, and were usable as play keys on harder difficulties of later releases.

Being a Korean series, the flavor of the music is in stark contrast to what is played in Beatmania most of the time, using lots of K-Pop, K-R&B and metal created by many in-house composers during its run. Despite the difference in music, the gameplay was very similar, so much so that Konami was able to win a lawsuit that halted production of new machines in 2007. That didn't stop its continued support on the PC and upgrades for the still working cabinets floating around. Its latest release, Azaure Expression ~ Integral Composition, came out in June 2012.

Ez2DJ 3rd Style

Ez2DJ 7th Style


DJMAX series - Windows, PlayStation Portable (2004-2010)

Japanese DJMAX Portable 3 Cover

American DJMAX Fever Cover

Formed by many of the same people behind Ez2DJ, DJMax was able to prevent patent infringement by keeping the series out of the arcades. Ditching the turntable, Pentavision used only regular keys for gameplay, which made it easier for input on the PC keyboards it debuted on. The total number of buttons to contend with were based on the difficulty selected, ranging from only 3 all the way up to 8. Sharing many of the same composers from older Ez2DJ titles, the music is more in line with its Korean brethren.

In 2008, series developer Pentavision came up with an arcade spin-off called DJMax Technika, wchich uses a touchscreen, as well as a version of DJMax for Android devices called Tap Sonic.

DJMAX (Windows)

DJMAX Trilogy (Windows)


DJ Hero series - PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, Wii, Xbox 360 (2009-2011)

DJ Hero Controller

As the leading company of the western rhythm game market of the time, Activision made a spinoff of its uber-smash hit Guitar Hero with DJ Hero. The contoller has 3 buttons and moves them onto the turntable itself, and also houses a crossfader and ways to add samples at various parts of the song. Almost every song available in the series was a mashup of 2 popular songs remixed by famous DJs. About a dozen songs were available to play with alongside player on a Guitar Hero controller. Many well-known mix artists lent their likenesses as avatars for the player, including Grandmaster Flash, DJ Jazzy Jeff, Daft Punk, and Deadmau5. DLC was available for both titles, with the possibility to import previously bought DLC into the sequel. Mere months after DJ Hero 2 was released, Activision pulled the plug on their rhythm games franchises due to dwindling sales, caused by their oversaturated glut of sequels and spinoffs. It's unlikely that the proposed third title will ever be released.

DJ Hero

DJ Hero 2

DJ Hero 2


Legacy

Due to the fickle nature of licensing and ownership of music, many of the tunes from the series - even the ones made in-house - cannot survive too long even among its sister Konami games. As it stands now, the only lasting song from the initial release's list of 7 tracks in the recent games is "E-Motion" on both Dance Dance Revolution and Pop'n Music. It is fortunate at least that Konami released as many home versions and a prodigious selection of soundtracks to give those unable to find the aging cabinets a chance to experience the sounds of its old releases. Though its reign has ended more than 10 years ago, its sequel still continues onward in Japanese arcades to this day, eclipsing the lifespan and popularity of its predecessor. Many of the composers are also still active in the rhythm game business, pumping out new tunes or releasing albums to this day. 5-Key Beatmania is dead. Long live Beatmania!

beatmania 5thMIX


Related Articles


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Intro
Main Composers

Page 2:
Beatmania
2ndMix
3rdMix
CompleteMix

Page 3:
4thMix
Append Gottamix
5thMix
CompleteMix2

Page 4:
Beatmania III
ClubMix
Dreams Come True
Best Hits

Page 5:
European Edit
Append Gottamix2
Core Remix
The Sound of Tokyo!

Page 6:
6thMix
7thMix
The Final
Beatmania (2006)

Page 7:
Game Boy Color
WonderSwan
Beatmania Pocket

Page 8:
BeatmaniaIIDX series
Beatmania Da!! series
Cameos
Ripoffs

Back to the Index